"I am the vine; you are the branches." — John 15:5

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A Service for the Ninth Sunday of Pentecost – August 2, 2020

The Ven. Susan Churchill-Lackey and the Rev. Canon Peter Lackey provide a service for the Ninth Sunday of Pentecost. The choir provides an offering of the song “More Than We Can Ask or Imagine”, Text: Gordon Light and Music: Melody Gordon Light, arranged by Andrew Donaldson.

A Service for the Eighth Sunday of Pentecost – July 26, 2020

The Ven. Susan Churchill-Lackey and the Rev. Canon Peter Lackey provide a service for the Eighth Sunday of Pentecost. Emmaus provides an offering of the song “Lord I Need You” by J Reeves, K Stanfill, M Maher, C Noclels and D Carson. Recorded June 19, 2019 at the Ottawa Anglican Cursillo’s outdoor summer prayer and praise service.

A Service for the Seventh Sunday of Pentecost – July 19, 2020

The Ven. Susan Churchill-Lackey and the Rev. Canon Peter Lackey provide a service for the Seventh Sunday of Pentecost. The choir provides an offering of the song “The Trumpets Sound, the Angels Sing” by Graham Kendrick.

A Service for the Sixth Sunday of Pentecost

The Ven. Susan Churchill-Lackey and the Rev. Canon Peter Lackey provide a service for the Sixth Sunday of Pentecost. Emmaus provides an offering of the song “Thrive” by Matthew West and Mark Hall.

A Virtual Camino Continued

by The Rev. Kay Richardson

Our return from Florida was a three day drive with two nights. All my walking during the trip was walking between the car and our hotel or food stops along the way. When we arrived at home, we were in quarantine for two weeks. During that time all my walking was within the house. This included walking up and down three flights of stairs and through all the rooms along the way. You could say that this was the most mountainous part of my Camino. I walk up and down the stairs every day, but during the quarantine, that was my exercise, so I did a lot more stairs than when I can walk outside.

During this time we could observe everything that was going on outside our windows. We arrived home on March 19 in the evening, and at that time it was still very snowy, as you can see by the picture I took from an upstairs window. Over those two weeks the snow largely disappeared.

 We also observed bunnies, especially in the back yard, and the robins started arriving. As time progressed, we observed spring slowly (oh so slowly) arriving.

Following the quarantine, it became possible to walk outside once again, mostly in our own neighbourhood. The lockdown was still in effect, and the parking lots at most parks where there are trails were closed, so walking near home was the best plan. Brian often walked with me, usually once a day. On my part, I usually walked twice, when possible. As you can see from the pictures, when I began walking, the trees were still bare, so I got to observe all the leaves coming out, and other plants coming to life. It was joyful walking through my area, seeing as much as I could notice.  There were many robins, some crows, grackles, and other birds.

Brian saw a family of racoons going through our neighbourhood.  Neighbors were cleaning out their cars, then their garages, and as time on, people were gathering outside on their lawns (distancing, of course). 

My Virtual Camino ended on Tuesday, May 26, which was a very hot day, going up to 33 degrees. It was time to reflect on the Camino and decide what to do next. The Camino brought me many blessings: I got into a new habit of walking every day, when possible. I developed a lovely relationship with my guide, Catherine Cromey. I saw spring arrive, and was able to see and talk to my neighbours who were out and about and distancing. This was also an opportunity to have some time for myself. It seems easier to reflect on things when I am walking than when I am sitting. It was a blessing to see all the beauty that surrounds us here in our own neighbourhood. And what will come next? I hope to continue the walking as long as I am able. Right now, in the immediate future, my next project is to pay attention to family as much as possible, now that we can gather, and we are still struggling with this awful pandemic. Finally, I pray for Blessings for all of you in all of your endeavours in the coming days and weeks. My you see God’s beauty all around you.

In This Together – The Anglican Diocese of Ottawa’s COVID-19 Plan (Version 1.0)

On July 7, 2020, the Rt. Rev. Shane A.D. Parker, Bishop of Ottawa, has authorized the release of In This Together, the Anglican Diocese of Ottawa’s COVID-19 Plan (Version 1.0). The plan includes a letter from Bishop Parker, a very detailed plan for the gradual reopening of the Anglican Diocese of Ottawa’s worship spaces and a checklist for parish leaders within each congregation to help them through the plan.

A Service for the Fifth Sunday of Pentecost – July 5, 2020

The Ven. Susan Churchill-Lackey and the Rev. Canon Peter Lackey provide a service for the Fifth Sunday of Pentecost. The choir provides an offering of the song “Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Thee”.

A Service for the Fourth Sunday of Pentecost – June 28, 2020

At St. Helen’s Anglican Church in Orleans, Ontario, Canada, the Ven. Susan Churchill-Lackey and the Rev. Canon Peter Lackey provide a service for the Fourth Sunday of Pentecost. Derek and Kim provide an offering of the song “I Am Persuaded” by Robin Mark.

A Service for the Third Sunday of Pentecost – June 21, 2020

At St. Helen’s Anglican Church in Orleans, Ontario, Canada, the Ven. Susan Churchill-Lackey and the Rev. Canon Peter Lackey provide a service for the Third Sunday of Pentecost. The Choir provides an offering of the song “Morning Has Broken”.

The Spirit of God as Fire  Personal Bible Study #2 June 2020

Key Passages:
Exodus 3:1-6
1 Peter 1:3-9

The presence of God and the Holy Spirit’s work and power, is frequently represented iconographically by flames.  It is a key image in the ‘burning bush’ passage in Exodus(3:1-6) and in the Pentecost event described in Acts 3:3, where it is revealed in ‘tongues as of fire’, but it is a multifaceted symbol elsewhere in scripture.

For anyone who has experienced a devouring fire in their home or witnessed a wild fire of any kind, it’s a challenge to reflect on fire in a positive way.  But even the aftermath of a forest fire eventually brings new life, as Creation heals and fresh growth blankets the forest floor. The image of fire can also be a comforting one, prompting memories of campfire gatherings, complete with s’mores and sing-a-longs, or winter evenings enjoyed resting by a fireplace dancing with crackling flames.

Hebrews 12:29 describes God as a ‘consuming fire’ but 1 Peter 1:3-9 draws together references in the Hebrew scriptures to ‘refiner’s fire’,  as a silversmith would use fire to purge the dross from precious metal.  As Peter+ has said, “A silver refiner knows when the metal is pure enough when the artist can see their reflection in the molten metal; as God see God’s self in us.” This fire is the presence of the sanctifying, indwelling Christ providing light and guidance, warmth and passion. Did not the disciples meeting the Risen Lord on the road to Emmaus describe their hearts as “burning within us.” (Luke 24:32)? This fire cleanses from sin, purifying, and thus enabling disciples to be open to God’s call, to a Spirit-filled life and to ministry in Christ’s name.

Reflect on how the Spirit of God has, or may, touch your life with Divine fire.   

The lyrics from Refiner’s Fire by Brian Doerksen truly speaks to this image:

Purify my heart
Let me be as gold
And precious silver
Purify my heart
Let me be as gold
Pure gold

Refiner’s fire
My heart’s one desire
Is to be holy
Set apart for You Lord
I choose to be holy
Set apart for You My Master
Ready to do Your will

A Service for the Second Sunday of Pentecost

At St. Helen’s Anglican Church in Orleans, Ontario, Canada, the Ven. Susan Churchill-Lackey and the Rev. Canon Peter Lackey provide a service for the Second Sunday of Pentecost. Derek and Reni provide an offering of the song “Open the Eyes of My Heart” by Paul Baloche.

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